Dating the Earth, the Sun, and the Stars

July 30, How old is the universe? It is a question answered for thousands of years with dreams and speculation. Only in the last 50 years have answers based on observation become possible, and even now astronomers disagree. Such disagreement reached the public’s eyes and ears recently when several astronomers announced that the universe was not 15 billion years old, as most astronomers had believed, but only 10 billion years old. Despite the publicity given their then-unpublished results, most astronomers remain unconvinced. To understand why, it is important to know how astronomers measure the age the universe’s age. Asking the age of the universe is a meaningful question because astronomers believe that the universe has not existed forever, but that it began in one unimaginably hot and dense fireball called the big bang. That our universe has a finite age is philosophically intriguing.

Study finds the universe might be 2 billion years younger

The same was long true of the cosmos. The ancient Greeks Eratosthenes and Aristarchus measured the size of the Earth and Moon, but could not begin to understand how old they were. With space telescopes, we can now even measure the distances to stars thousands of light-years away using parallax, the same geometric technique proposed by Aristarchus, but no new technology can overcome the fundamental mismatch between the human lifespan and the timescales of the Earth, stars, and universe itself.

Despite this, we now know the ages of the Earth and the universe to much better than 1 percent, and are beginning to date individual stars.

noted Sky & Telescope, dating back to a mere million years after the Big The earliest age of the universe was filled with light from the Big Bang. The age of the black hole found in December, per , puts it.

The Earth is 4,54 billion years old. This age has been determined with the radioactive dating technique. The precise decay rate of radioactive elements is used as a clock: the number of daughter products in one rock indicates its age. The oldest meteorites ever dated in the Solar System are 4,56 billion years old, the oldest minerals on Earth are 4,4 billion years old, and the oldest rocks on Earth are 4 billion years old.

These ages are very consistent because the meteorites had to form before the accretion of our planet, and the Earth had to cool down before the first minerals could crystallise. The Solar System was formed around 4. Dating meteorites thus allows us to give a lower age to the Solar System 4,56 billion years old. Lead isotope isochron that Clair Patterson used to determine the age of the solar system and Earth Patterson, C. The animation shows progressive growth over million years Myr of the lead isotope ratios for two stony meteorites Nuevo Laredo and Forest City from initial lead isotope ratios matching those of the Canyon Diablo iron meteorite.

Courtesy of Wikipedia. Skip to main content. What about the age of the solar system? Climate Sea Levels Why will sea level rise not be the same everywhere? How can we date corals?

Age of the Universe

We’ve all lost track of time at one point or another, but astronomers really go all in. Recent studies show they may have overestimated the age of the universe by more than a billion years — a surprising realization that is forcing them to rethink key parts of the scientific story of how we got from the Big Bang to today. The lost time is especially vexing because, in a universe full of mysteries , its age has been viewed as one of the few near-certainties. By , the European Planck space telescope’s detailed measurements of cosmic radiation seemed to have yielded the final answer: All that was left to do was to verify that number using independent observations of bright stars in other galaxies.

Instead of confirming Planck’s measurements, they started getting a distinctly different result.

to remedy these observational uncertainties. One assumed the standard model (​Ωm = 1,. ΩΛ = 0), dating the age of the universe to to = /h billion years old.

Creationist’s Blind Dates. The standard scientific estimate is that the universe is about 15 billion years old, the earth about 4. It is important to recognize from the start that there are independent procedures for obtaining each of these estimates, and that the procedures yield ranges of values that overlap.

In the case of the universe, estimates can be obtained from astronomical methods or considerations of nuclear reactions. Astrophysicists can measure the rate at which galaxies are receding and use these measurements to compute the time needed for the universe to expand to its present size. A second, independent, astronomical method is to use standard techniques to measure some parameters of stars mass, luminosity, compositor, and surface temperature , from which a well-confirmed theory of the life histories of stars enables physicists to compute their.

Finally, considerations of radioactive decay make it possible to calculate the time at which certain heavy elements were formed. These techniques are somewhat similar to the radiometric methods of dating rocks, which I shad consider in a little more detail. For an excellent overview of the various ways of assigning an age to the universe, and an exposition of the radioactive decay method, see Schramm Although the clear consensus of physical techniques is that the universe is billions of years old, and although this result controverts the claims of at least some contemporary Creationists, the principal Creationist attack has been directed against the standard geological claim that the earth is about 4.

Two kinds of arguments are offered. In the first place, Creationists argue that methods of radiometric dating employ false assumptions. They continue by using special techniques of their own to assign to the earth an age of a few thousand years. Excellent and exhaustive explanations of the errors in Creationist arguments about dating methods have been given by Stephen Brush , and Brent Dalrymple

Uranium dating suggests new age of universe

You may have heard that the Earth is 4. This was calculated by taking precise measurements of things in the dirt and in meteorites and using the principles of radioactive decay to determine an age. This page will show you how that was done. Radioactive nuclides decay with a half-life.

The universe, like so many fading stars, does not readily give up its age. Indeed, the very best guesses cosmologists have made range.

This illustration outlines the two techniques astronomers have used to determine the universe’s age. In the “traditional method,” astronomers used measurements of the universe’s expansion rate to calculate the age of the cosmos. They determined the expansion rate by measuring the distances to nearby galaxies. They then compared those measurements with the speed at which those galaxies are receding from Earth.

Astronomers used that data to calculate the universe’s age. In the “white-dwarf-cooling method,” astronomers studied the faintest white dwarfs in a globular cluster. Globular clusters are among the oldest clusters of stars in the universe. And the faintest and coolest white dwarfs within globular clusters represent the oldest stars in the clusters. Earlier Hubble observations showed that the first stars formed less than 1 billion years after the universe’s birth in the big bang.

So, finding the oldest stars puts astronomers within arm’s reach of the universe’s age. Toggle navigation. RSS Feed. Age-Dating the Universe.

Independent age estimates

We hear that rocks are a certain age, and stars are another age. And the Universe itself is But how do astronomers figure this out?

One assumed the standard model (Omega m = 1, Omega Lambda = 0), dating the age of the universe to t0 = / h billion years old (Ga). However, for large or​.

September 12, The universe is looking younger every day, it seems. New calculations suggest the universe could be a couple billion years younger than scientists now estimate, and even younger than suggested by two other calculations published this year that trimmed hundreds of millions of years from the age of the cosmos. The huge swings in scientists’ estimates—even this new calculation could be off by billions of years—reflect different approaches to the tricky problem of figuring the universe’s real age.

Scientists estimate the age of the universe by using the movement of stars to measure how fast it is expanding. If the universe is expanding faster, that means it got to its current size more quickly, and therefore must be relatively younger. The expansion rate, called the Hubble constant , is one of the most important numbers in cosmology. A larger Hubble Constant makes for a faster moving—and younger—universe.

The generally accepted age of the universe is Jee’s team came up with a Hubble Constant of Jee used a concept called gravitational lensing —where gravity warps light and makes far away objects look closer. They rely on a special type of that effect called time delay lensing, using the changing brightness of distant objects to gather information for their calculations. But Jee’s approach is only one of a few new ones that have led to different numbers in recent years, reopening a simmering astronomical debate of the s that had been seemingly settled.

The Age of the Universe is a Function of Time

The universe, like so many fading stars, does not readily give up its age. Indeed, the very best guesses cosmologists have made range anywhere from 10 billion to 18 billion years old. So how long ago was it that a colossal explosion known as the big bang birthed our world and others? A new report published today in Nature helps resolve the mystery.

In the “traditional method,” astronomers used measurements of the universe’s expansion rate to calculate the age of the cosmos. They determined the expansion.

A team of 1, scientists from around the world contributed to the detection of gravitational waves from a merging pair of binary neutron stars, followed by the detection of gamma-rays. Boston: Astronomers have used gravitational waves – ripples in the fabric of space and time caused by a violent cosmic event – to measure the age of the universe.

The direct detection of gravitational waves from at least five sources during the past two years offers spectacular confirmation of Einstein’s model of gravity and space-time, researchers said. They then identified the origin of the cataclysm in a source in the galaxy NGC spotted in images taken with various time delays at wavelengths from the X-ray to the radio.

NGC, its host galaxy, has an outward velocity due to the expansion of the universe that can be measured from its spectral lines. Knowing how far away it is and how fast the galaxy is moving from us allows scientists to calculate the time since the expansion began – the age of the universe: between about

How Do We Know How Old Everything Is?

Using known distances of 50 galaxies from Earth to refine calculations in Hubble’s constant, a research team led by a University of Oregon astronomer estimates the age of the universe at Approaches to date the Big Bang, which gave birth to the universe, rely on mathematics and computational modeling, using distance estimates of the oldest stars, the behavior of galaxies and the rate of the universe’s expansion. The idea is to compute how long it would take all objects to return to the beginning.

A key calculation for dating is the Hubble’s constant, named after Edwin Hubble who first calculated the universe’s expansion rate in

Age of the Universe. How do we measure its age? –Expansion rate of Universe. –Ages of oldest stars: -Ages of white dwarfs: -Radioactive dating.

Over the past century, astronomers have deduced several ways to estimate the age of the universe. To find the Hubble constant, astronomers observe distant galaxies and measure their distances by using Cepheid variable stars or other objects of known intrinsic brightness as well as how fast they recede from Earth. But there was a problem. So astronomers of different mindsets got different values for the constant. A megaparsec equals 3. Therefore, the two groups estimated a range for the age of the universe of about 10 to 16 billion years.

Age of the Earth and Universe, Radiometric Clock Dating – Hugh Ross